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Three (3) Signs You Are THAT Person Who Talks Too Much In Meetings (And How to Stop Being That Person)

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I was at a cafe meeting yesterday with a buyer and seller talking about a business.

Sitting back and watching them was really interesting – it was like they were both trying to impress each other with their business knowledge and material wealth stories, but no one was actually listening to anything.

What is that ? I felt they both needed a hug and assured everything is okay, but we’re not here to talk about your new boat.

I had a similar (but very different) meeting a few years back with a different seller and buyer – after the meeting the seller asked me:

Les: “John, how do you think the meeting went ?”

Me: “I thought it was a good meeting”.

Les: “I thought it was a terrible meeting”.

Me: “Really, why ?”

Les: “Because I did all the talking”.

Les, felt that the buyer should have been more engaged – was the buyer being genuine, or just there to “fish” for information ?

Here’s three (3) signs that you could be talking too much at meetings that might help you:

1. You Add Unnecessary Noise To The Meeting Room

While its good to acknowledge when someone raises don’t go on and on about how much you agree with them. Everyone heard it (or they should have). A quick ‘That’s a great point” will keep the conversation and agenda moving instead of making the meeting longer with unnecessary talk.

2. You “Overshare” Personal Experiences

Relating everything back to your own “personal experiences” is not a good idea. The meeting will get off track and turn into a biography of your life – not good.

3. You Keep Changing The Subject

Stay engaged in what is being discussed, and don’t re-rail the conversation by changing the subject.

Don’t self-indulge by interrupting others and changing the direction of the conversation just because you had a good idea.

Listening to what others are saying while at the same time move the discussion forward with thoughtful comment or encouraging gestures work best.

Legendary Rugby League coach, the late Jack Gibson once said to Steve ‘Blocker” Roach in a NSW State of Origin camp:

“Blocker, you’ve got two ears and one mouth – use them accordingly”.

 

 

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